Patent & Trade Mark
Attorneys
We are
Experts in Navigating IP in the Asia Pacific Region
Working with clients in
Thanks to many years of global experience, FB Rice has a network of trusted advisors in all key jurisdictions. We turn to those advisors when assisting our clients to promote their interests.

For specific information on our Asia Pacific capability, click here.
One door to South East Asia
For a seamless service for filing and prosecuting patent and trade mark applications in South East Asia, click here.
Rachel Hooke

Partner

Rachel Hooke
“The importance of innovation in the medical technology is growing and FB Rice is here to help our clients protect their investment in research.”
“The importance of innovation in the medical technology is growing and FB Rice is here to help our clients protect their investment in research.”
New Zealand to introduce a one-year grace period
New Zealand looks set to introduce a new one-year grace period into the Patents Act 2013 after ratifying the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) on 25 October 2018.
New Zealand looks set to introduce a new one-year grace period into the Patents Act 2013 after ratifying the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) on 25 October 2018.
07 June 2017
FB Rice receives Asia IP Tier 1 Ranking for patent proscution
Asia IP has released their rankings for 2017, and we are delighted to have received a Tier 1 ranking for Patent Prosecution. This ranking is testament to our commitment to clients in Australia and abroad, and we look forward to continuing to provide this service.
Asia IP has released their rankings for 2017, and we are delighted to have received a Tier 1 ranking for Patent Prosecution. This ranking is testament to our commitment to clients in Australia and abroad, and we look forward to continuing to provide this service.
John Hogan

Senior Associate

John Hogan
John is a Senior Associate of FB Rice and has practised in the fields of mechanical and general engineering patents for over 10 years. John's practice covers the protection of IP rights for his clients, as well as advice and design guidance on the avoidance of infringement of competitor IP rights.
John is a Senior Associate of FB Rice and has practised in the fields of mechanical and general engineering patents for over 10 years. John's practice covers the protection of IP rights for his clients, as well as advice and design guidance on the avoidance of infringement of competitor IP rights.
25 September 2017
Brews & Brands - Registering and protecting your trade marks overseas
Obtaining registration rights early can prevent brew branding headaches and significant outlays down the track as your business expands.
Obtaining registration rights early can prevent brew branding headaches and significant outlays down the track as your business expands.
Inventorship – a muddy concept at best
Inventorship has been described as “one of muddiest concepts in the muddy metaphysics of the patent law.” Mueller Brass Co. v. Reading Industries, Inc., 352 F.Supp. 1357, 1372 (E.D.Pa. 1972). Determining inventorship is a complex issue that is undertaken on a much stricter basis than authorship of a scientific publication. It can also be a particularly contentious issue when people are not named as inventors. Not only can this lead to alienation, but it can also lead to legal issues. For example, a patent may be invalid if incorrect inventors are intentionally named. During litigation, a defendant may also be able to identify an unnamed inventor and obtain an assignment from them, thereby qualifying as a co-owner of the patent and no longer subject to the litigation.
Inventorship has been described as “one of muddiest concepts in the muddy metaphysics of the patent law.” Mueller Brass Co. v. Reading Industries, Inc., 352 F.Supp. 1357, 1372 (E.D.Pa. 1972). Determining inventorship is a complex issue that is undertaken on a much stricter basis than authorship of a scientific publication. It can also be a particularly contentious issue when people are not named as inventors. Not only can this lead to alienation, but it can also lead to legal issues. For example, a patent may be invalid if incorrect inventors are intentionally named. During litigation, a defendant may also be able to identify an unnamed inventor and obtain an assignment from them, thereby qualifying as a co-owner of the patent and no longer subject to the litigation.